This poor aquamarine cushion got badly damaged as you can see on these 2 photos. I don’t know exactly what happened to it but this is how it arrived to my workshop for repair.

Broken aquamarine viewed from the top

Broken aquamarine viewed from the top

Broken aquamarine pavillion
Broken aquamarine pavillion

After studying it for a little while I decided to cut it into a heart shape to retain the maximum of the original size and weight of the stone.  The first step was to preform the shape and to cut the new facets .

Preformed heart shape

Preformed heart shape

Now that the rough shape is done and the new facets and all the damage has been taken out I can go on to refining the shape and facet angles. It is at this stage that my 25+ years experienced eyes and hands make all the difference as it is very easy to get the cleft of the heart off centre or having the heart look a bit bigger on one side compared to the other. While the angles of the facets have been adapted to accommodate the given angles of the original cut it is very close to what a “proper” heart shape facets should be. Coloured gemstones are rather forgiving and will still sparkle in all their coloured glory even if the angles aren’t strictly perfect unlike diamonds.

Finished heart shape aquamarine

Finished heart shape aquamarine

I know I am a bit biased after working on it but I think it’s a stunning little aquamarine! Now it is up to my client to make some pretty piece of jewellery with it.

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